An initiative of the Menil Collection with cultural, educational, and social justice organizations in the Greater Houston area.
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Project Row Houses

The mission of Project Row Houses (PRH) is to be a catalyst for transforming community through the celebration of art and African American history and culture.

PRH was founded in 1993 as a result of the vision of local African American artists who wanted to have a positive creative presence in their own community. Working with artists and volunteer from throughout Houston, PRH renovated 22 abandoned shotgun-style houses on a two-block site in historic Third Ward. PRH seeks to shift the view of art from traditional studio practice to a more conceptual base of transforming the social environment. Central to the vision of PRH is the social role of art as seen in neighborhood revitalization, historic preservation, community service, and youth education. Today PRH includes more than 50 buildings spread over almost 10 blocks.

For the Gandhi’s Legacy: Houston Perspectives, PRH is organing a three-program series, Gandhi in the Present: Strategies of Nonviolence through Artistic Practice.

Related Events
Nov 3
2014
7 PM
Talk
South Central
4920 Cullen Blvd, 77004

Recovering a Vision of Gandhi and His Meaning for the 21st Century

This eminent civil-rights activist, teacher of nonviolent resistance, and minister will speak on the relevance of Gandhi’s ethics of nonviolence.

Dec 8
2014
7 PM
Talk
Historic Third Ward
2310 Elgin St Houston, TX 77004

Right Beyond the Site: White Gentrifying Bodies and Black (Art)

A look at gentrification in Houston’s Third Ward as a “territorializing force” traversing and submerging existing Black geographies, bodies, and spatial practices.

Jan 5
2015
POSTPONED
Conversation
Historic Third Ward
the Eldorado Ballroom, Elgin Street, Houston, TX, United States

Organized Love: It’s a Process

POSTPONED–Please watch this site for NEW DATE to come

A conversation about the effectiveness of protests against oppressive systems in Rabéa Ballin’s artwork and Danielle Burns’s exhibition, “Organized Love.”